Big Beginnings

 

 

After walking around the F-111C in my last post (and sorry for the delay until this one, by the way), I thought it would be fitting to round out the F-111 story with some images from the other end of its life cycle.

So, Pig fans – or, more accurately, Aardvark Admirers – enjoy. Each image opens to about 2000px on its long side, and such detail as I could find is included in the captions.

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6 thoughts on “Big Beginnings

  1. Simply awesome photos and content. I really miss the old Airscape Mag, but you’re doing fine as it is. Please keep up the good work!

  2. I don’t know where you find this stuff, but I love it.

    I’ve always found it interesting how clean and sleek planes look when they’re in prototype form. Once the production model is out and they stick all sorts of antennas, fins, external stores, etc on it, it loses some of that magic.

    I wonder why none of the F-111s ended up in civilian hands. There are privately owned Harriers, Phantoms, MiGs, and others. But no F-111s that I’m aware of…

    1. Oh, I’m just not afraid to waste vast amounts of time. Wait. Yes I am. I just can’t help myself.
      I’m not exactly sure why no F-111s ended up in private hands. You’d think if a determined private group can get an Avro Vulcan back into the sky, an Aardvark would be reasonably achievable. BUt I suspect the maintainers at RAAF Amberley may have more to say on the subject…

      1. If you can get a Vulcan flying again, anything is possible. I’d think a Constellation would be a snap by comparison.

        I often wonder if the latest generation of fighters (F-16, F18, etc) will be flyable by private owners in the future. They contain so much high-tech software and hardware and need such extensive and specialized support that I’m not sure it will be possible. It’s like the difference between a 1968 Mustang and a 2014 version. I could swing wrenches on the classic car, but the modern iteration would prove far more challenging without the proper diagnostic and repair tools.

      2. Yep, we can’t stop progress. And maybe we won’t be able to start it again later. I tell you what I’d settle for: An F-5A. Simple, streamlined and solid. You remember in my F-35 article I wrote about the handful of aircraft prototypes that came out of the shop perfectly formed? The F-5A tops the list. Pure genius with wings.

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